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Learnings from launching our own learning initiative

Posted on Sep 28, 2018 by Rob MacAllister

 

In March, I wrote an article titled ‘How does a learning company launch a learning initiative’. In it I spoke about the launch of magpie, our own learning recommendation engine, to our entire staff.

To promote the launch we ran a campaign titled ‘Dogfood’, based on the idea in tech of using your own product, often called eating your own dog food. The c

ampaign name also tied in with the campaign strapline, “Do GF”. We called our product globalfilter (or gf for sort) internally. Therefore, #DOGF was born.

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Topics: Learning & Development, Work Technologies, initiative

Continuous Learning - A Hackers Guide

Posted on Sep 06, 2018 by Adam Lacey

Getting people to be proactive about their own learning in an organisation is not easy. It takes time, commitment and leadership buy-in to really work, but it is possible. The issue with any task that looks insurmountable is where to start. What ripples are required to make the tidal wave of change you need?

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Topics: Learning, Learning & Development

Indispensable

Posted on Sep 06, 2018 by Marc Zao-Sanders

Least important --- Most important

Where would you place learning on this spectrum for your company?

 

I’ve been talking to a lot of financial companies recently about the L&D market. Opinions are polarised. Some see an outdated, overblown, superfluous industry that will soon be discarded or replaced. Some see a massive and growing market, ripe for another wave of disruption. Who’s right? Neither, entirely. Here’s why.

 

Indispensable, transcendent

In a constantly-evolving global economy, learning must be the main long-term business priority. Learning is a clear - and possibly unique - theme running through the megatrends of our time: artificial intelligence, digitization, extended careers, flexible working and individualism. These trends mean changes for businesses (eg digital transformation) which require a frequent reskilling of their workforces. Ray Stata, former CEO of Analog Devices, puts this well:

“The rate at which organizations and individuals learn may well become the only sustainable competitive advantage. Products can be copied. Services can be copied. Even processes can be copied. Things like Six Sigma are available on the open market. But if you’re learning more rapidly than the competition, you can get ahead and stay ahead.”

 

Learning is much more important than recruitment. Recruitment, the never-ending war for talent, is a zero-sum game. If company A gets the star, company B doesn’t. Learning is different; a rising tide that lifts all boats. Perhaps leaders should take a less tribal, more progressive and holistic view of human capability and how best to nurture it.

 

Many of the world’s most successful, long-termist leaders are emphatic about the importance of learning. Satya Nadella, Microsoft’s CEO, emphasised this in an interview with Business Insider, “Going back to business: If that applies to boys and girls at school, I think it also applies to CEOs, like me, and entire organizations, like Microsoft. We want to be not a “know-it-all” but “learn-it-all” organization.” Jeff Bezos in his last annual letter to shareholders underlined the importance of high standards and teachable skills. Mark Zuckerberg started a book clubfollowed by millions of followers. In his final letter to shareholders, then CEO of General Electric, Jack Welch, described the company as a ‘Global Learning Organization’ - the fourth page in particular is worth reading in full.

Learning is a large part of what makes us human. We are a rare breed of mammal which happens to be neotenic, ie we retain many juvenile (physical and cognitive) features. We therefore learn all the way through our lives and are blessed with a deep, nagging curiosity about a very wide range of matters.

Finally, learning is good for us. It’s linked to higher levels of happiness, income and social success.

 

And yet...

 

L&D has a tarnished reputation. Corporate learning content is often considered to be copious, uninspiring, or low quality. As a result it is used little and therefore vulnerable to budget cuts. The predominant technology underpinning L&D - the Learning Management System - is built on antiquated technologies, light years from the addictive, consumer grade experiences we enjoy away from work today. Compliance hasn’t helped. That for a decade compliance drills have fallen at the feet of L&D is a shame for everyone. The work of training and learning teams has been stained by that association. And so it is that CLOs rarely have a seat at the boardroom and the voice of L&D is muffled.

How to unpick this paradox?

 

I think we can unpick it by separating L&D supply from demand. Demand is massive and growing:

An evolving knowledge economy of a quarter of a billion knowledge workers who are re-skilling at shorter and shorter intervals but over longer and longer careers practically guarantees the shape of this chart, perhaps permanently.

 

But the supply side has historically disappointed and in many cases, continues to do so. We’ve been slow on the take-up of new technologies and content is mostly pretty dry and sometimes obsolete. Couple this with the fact that the benefits of learning - though axiomatic - are enormously difficult to measure. We have the perfect storm for a paradox: learning is both the most and least important thing we do at work. Break it down to unpick the paradox: supply looks bad; demand looks good.

 

But notice that the apparent paradox is starting to unwind anyway as consumer-grade influences, AI and other digital breakthroughs finally start to touch on this thing of ours.

 

Is any of the above of any use to you?

Perhaps you can use some of it to get your CEO to play ball. Try to persuade her or him to issue a statement about the importance of investing in the workforce of the firm (and feel free to repurpose any of the arguments presented here). The case will be even stronger - as we have been overjoyed and slightly surprised to see with certain global clients - if your CEO commits to and shares some learning activities her/himself. This will make all your L&D battles easier, from getting sign off from budget holders, to getting learners, to learn to proving ROI. There are gains to be had by all stakeholders: employee engagement, external PR, financial return.

 

And in this way, you may shift the importance needle to the right.

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Topics: Work Technologies, market, Learning, Learning & Development

Unsupported L&D, unsupported browsers

Posted on Jun 23, 2017 by Juan D'Achiardi

Fig.1: Desktop Browser Version (Partially Combined) Worldwide Market Share

 

Our users

From a quick analysis done of our traffic over the past year (May 2016 to May 2017):

  • Chrome clearly comes out as boss with 63% of total sessions.
  • Internet Explorer & Edge follow – not too closely – with 14% (11% IE and 3% for Edge).
  • Non-supported IE versions make up 0.55% of the Filtered total sessions in a year. 

 

Why even write this?

We hear a lot from large organisations that legacy software and hardware hold them back. For L&D professionals that want to improve people’s working lives, that’s a frustration. During a talk given by Donald Taylor at Learning Technologies, this legacy issue resonated across the auditorium. IT departments don’t always know the full benefits of using certain software or of how up-to-date competitors are. Of course, multi-site setups and high-sensitivity sectors and departments complicate the situation further. This article doesn’t claim to help in all situations!

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Topics: Business, Technology, Learning & Development, browsers

Productivity, skills and intelligent learning recommendations

Posted on Jun 15, 2017 by Marc Zao-Sanders

tl;dr

The system supporting skills and careers development is inept and that costs the world trillions. But the future for learning is bright: higher quality, justified, data-driven, technology-enabled, culturally embedded, more of it. That future arrives sooner with useful, relevant, high-quality, fresh, intelligent learning recommendations.

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Topics: Productivity, Business, Critical Thinking, Technology, recommendation, Online Learning, Learning & Development, Artifical Intelligence

Body language for active listening

Posted on Nov 28, 2016 by Alan Gurney

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Do you often find it hard to understand the messages your colleagues are trying to convey? Perhaps you're not being fully attentive?

An active listener pays full attention to the speaker and ensures they understand the information being delivered. You can’t be distracted by an incoming call or a Facebook status update. You have to be present and in the moment.

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Topics: Learning & Development, Productivity

Words matter - choosing the right language

Posted on Jun 20, 2016 by Alan Gurney

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Which of these sentences sounds better to you?

a) The best words are short and clear.
b) It’s not advantageous to use elongated and vague words.

The words and phrases you use have a real impact on the readability of your documents and communications. Keep reading and we'll show you four simple ways to improve your writing and explain why the first sentence is better than the second.

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Topics: Business, Productivity, Learning & Development

5 things to do at the Learning Technologies Summer Forum 2016

Posted on Jun 09, 2016 by Paolo Lenotti

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The Learning Technologies Summer Forum (Tuesday 14 June, Olympia London) is less than a week away. To get you inspired I'm sharing five things to watch out for both before and during the conference. If you're going to LTSF, see you there!

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Topics: Learning & Development, Productivity

Solving the productivity puzzle - Free seminar by Filtered at LTSF 2016

Posted on Jun 08, 2016 by Paolo Lenotti

If skills have a major bearing on workforce productivity - especially in developed economies where the majority of employees are knowledge workers - why is it that systemic under-training and inappropriate training methods are commonplace in today's business environment, leading to skills gaps and a decline in productivity?

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Topics: Learning & Development, Productivity

24 minutes a week

Posted on Apr 28, 2016 by Marc Zao-Sanders

Research we conducted last year showed that inadequate training leads to skills gaps, reducing company profitability and wider economic growth. Over 2,000 UK workers contributed to that research. 60% claimed they need key workplace skills to perform in their jobs successfully, however only 25% received training on the skills they need. 41% never received any form of training from their employers at all. 85% admitted there is no compulsory training offered at work. (Source: UK workforce 2015: skills gaps and training habits - Filtered).

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Topics: Learning & Development